Hayes & Yeading United Football Club

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Karamoko - Kirk
Jimmy Keeble

The first entry, WH (Jimmy) Keeble, owes his place less to what he achieved with Botwell Mission, the forerunners of Hayes, than with his previous club, Wimbledon. With the Dons, he won an England amateur cap against Ireland in 1920, and became the first international to play for the Missioners. A centre-half or full-back, he arrived in December 1923, and was a member of the side which reached the quarter-finals of the Amateur Cup, before going out to Erith & Belvedere. Before leaving at the end of the 1923-4 season, he made 15 appearances.

Gary KeenGary Keen signed for a club record fee in summer 1990 from Hendon.  A midfielder, he had a sweet left foot, but never really lived up to expectations, and returned to Hendon in March 1992. In his time at Hayes he made 61+4 appearances and scored 13 goals. He was 28 when he joined, having already had two spells with St Albans, and he later went on to play for Bromley and Purfleet.

Gary’s namesake, Tommy (Taffy) Keen, was also a left-sided player, at left-half, inside- and outside-left, either side of World War II. He first played for Hayes in January 1934, scoring on his debut; in fact, he had a knack of scoring in the few gamTaffy Keenes he played for the first team, being a stalwart of the reserves until September 1937, when he left for Uxbridge. During five seasons, he made only 11 appearances and scored four goals. During the war, he played for Hayes Wasps, and returned to Hayes for 1946-7, when he made a further 14 appearances, scoring three goals. One other curiosity: in January 1936, he ran a line in an Athenian League match against Romford until half-time, when the referee arrived.

Three players by the name of Kelly have played for Hayes. The first of these was Peter Kelly, a utility player, who could play at wing-half, inside forward or full-back. He was a regular in his first season, 1959-60, but found it hard thereafter to hold down a place. This led him to join Southall in February 1961, but he was back at the end of the season, only to resign in September 1962 and join Chesham United. He later played for Uxbridge, then Chesham again, and Hampton in 1968-9. During his time at Hayes, he played 36 games and scored twice.

The next of the name was Tony Kelly, who joined Hayes from Harefield United in December 1986, having previously played for Hillingdon and Tony KellySouthall. He quickly made his mark as a tough-tackling forward, and was made club captain in 1988. During this spell with Hayes, he represented the Isthmian League against Combined Services in April 1989 and scored the only goal of the game. In June 1989 he was transferred to Wealdstone for a then club record fee of £10,000. He returned to Hayes at the start of the 1992-3 season for £3,000 and stayed for four years, before moving to Hendon in January 1996 for another four-figure fee. In his two stints for Hayes he made 265+8 appearances and scored 64 goals. After Hendon, he played for Hemel Hempstead and became their manager in 2002-3.

The last member of the clan was Warren Kelly, a contemporary of Tony, who joined Hayes from St Albans in August 1988 at the age ofWarren Kelly k20, having previously played for Watford and Hemel Hempstead, and having represented Hertfordshire.  Although a defender, he was a penalty expert and scored 30 goals in 331+10 appearances over nine seasons, during which he also became club captain. He gained a cap for representing the Isthmian League six times while with Hayes. It came as a surprise when he joined Stevenage for a tribunal-assessed fee of £12,000 after Hayes’ first season in the Conference, most of which he missed through injury, but he was soon off to Rushden & Diamonds, St Albans and Hendon, where he eventually became coach and assistant to Dave Anderson. When Anderson was appointed manager of AFC Wimbledon, Kelly followed.

Wherever he went, Bruce Forsyth look-alike Jim Kelman, a technical officer with the GPO, went about his work modestly.  Originally from Scotland, he joined Hayes in September 1969 from Wokingham Town, although he started with Reading and played for Maidenhead United against Hayes in 1964 and then for Slough Town. He had a high work-rate and played for Hayes for three seasons, making 141+2 appearances and scoring 22 goals. He was selected for London FA in the annual match against Birmingham in March 1971 and scored both goals in a 2-1 victory. But, when Keith Jameson signed in August 1972, Jim read the writing on the wall and joined Southall. Later he managed Hungerford Town and Wycombe Wanderers immediately before Martin O’Neill – in fact, it is generally felt that he laid down secure foundations at Loakes Park, which launched O’Neill on his meteoric career as a manager. Later he managed Chertsey Town and Chesham United.

Dave Kennedy was a popular reserve player, then reserve manager who surprisingly did not make a first team appearance. He however warrants a mention here as the Clubs first full time Commercial Manager.

Kenny Kent had had a pretty full career before he joined Hayes in 1969 from Slough at the age of 27, together with Bobby Hatt. He had started as a junior with Brentford, then joined Chesham, often playing for Kenny KentReading reserves, Maidenhead United and Slough, where he won an Athenian League runners-up medal under Bob Gibbs. With Chesham he reached the final of the Amateur Cup in 1968, after battling all the way from the preliminary round, but had the unfortunate experience of missing a penalty ten minutes from time against Leytonstone, who won by the only goal scored. He was selected for both Middlesex and the Athenian League, and was a member of the side which knocked Bristol Rovers out of the FA Cup in 1972. In 1974 he moved to Maidenhead United in order to cut down on travelling, but he could not resist the temptation to return to Hayes under Bob Gibbs in August 1975, and was voted Player of the Year for 1975-6. He retired at the end of the next season at the age of 34, having made 301+5 appearances, and scored 30 goals..

We start with LG Kershaw – those were the Corinthian days, when a player was known by his initials, and his given names were not necessarily divulged. ‘LG’ was a winger – he played mainly at outside-left, but also operated sometimes on the other flank. He made 72 appearances and scored 30 goals – a decent yield for a winger – between 1927 and 1931, and witnessed the transition from Botwell Mission in the Spartan League to Hayes in the Athenian. Later, between 1933 and 1936, at least, he played for Hayesco, the sports section of the Anglo-Swiss Nestlé company. In August 1943 he was photographed in a local paper giving away his daughter in marriage, and in October 1957 he made his last appearance in the Hayes programme, having won £6 in a competition. His address at the time was in Cranford Park Road.

We have to fast-forward 55 playing years to record Micky Kiely, aMicky Kiely .centre-forward, who joined from Slough Town in November 1982, when manager Roy Ruffell’s cheeky bid to sign Archie Gemmill and Alan Taylor fell through. He was a schoolteacher, who had gone to the United States on a sports scholarship and returned on loan to Wycombe Wanderers, refusing ever to play for Slough again. He made 102+10 appearances for Hayes, scoring 33 goals, before returning to Slough, despite his earlier words, in March 1983, to the disgust of new manager George Goode. When Slough transfer-listed him in January 1986, Goode pinned his faith in Keith Morris instead, and Kiely joined Hendon under Ted Hardy.

Five players by the name of King have represented Hayes. The first of these should have brought glory to Hayes, but he found his true milieu elsewhere. Alan King, born in Shepherd's Bush in 1922, and schooled at Hounslow Heath School and Spring Grove Grammar School, first played for his old boys team on leaving school, and then joined Acton Invicta (later United), in 1939. During the war years he played for QPR reserves alongside Arthur Shaw and George Jones, and was a member of the side which won the London Combination. When he was called up, he went into the RAOC and served in France, Belgium, Holland and Germany, latterly with the 2nd Canadian Corps, taking part in the invasion of the German-held Walcheren Island. He saw further service in Sierra Leone, where he captained the British Army XI against the RAF and RN. He was demobbed in autumn 1946 and joined Hayes. Over the next two and a half seasons, he flitted between first team and reserves, playing at centre-forward and on both wings. During his first season he led the club’s combined scoring charts, with 11 for the 1st team and 19 for the reserves, and he totalled 38 appearances and 18 goals before moving to Hounslow Town in December 1948. At Hounslow he really sparkled, as that club went from strength to strength, and he rattled in goals. He was the subject of an article in Amateur Sport in February 1950, where it was reported that he had been selected for both the Corinthian League and for an FA XI, and was strong and two-footed. He was one of several players of this period who achieved their true potential away from Hayes, especially at Hounslow.

An approximate contemporary of Alan was Peter King, who, but for military service, would have made a much larger contribution to Hayes in the immediately post-war years. Peter was a friend of Frank Bridges and also a member of the Royal Navy and was recommended to Hayes by Frank. His appearances were limited to when he was posted to the United Kingdom in 1945-6 and 1948-9. But when he was far away, Hayes was never far from his thoughts, and he telephoned his best wishes from Marseille before the Amateur Cup match with Leytonstone in 1952, and sent a telegram from New Zealand on another occasion. Like his namesake, he played on either wing, and made a total of 29 appearances and scored three goals.

The last of the name to merit a textual entry in this A to Z is Roger King, who came from Southall at the age of 27 in September 1970, after six seasons at Western Road, latterly as club captain. While at Southall, he played in almost every position except goalkeeper, and made two appearances for Middlesex and two for the Athenian League, but he had no regrets at leaving: “I enjoyed it there, but I’m glad now I made the break. I won’t go back”. He had been a member of the Southall side which reached the last 16 of the Amateur Cup, alongside other players who later played for Hayes, such as Brian Caterer, Peter Wright and Dave Ellis. At Hayes he played in the back line and achieved another representative selection for Middlesex in November 1970. During the season he made 39 appearances and scored two goals, both – strangely – in the FA Cup, before returning to...Southall. Like Mick Kiely after him, he had a love-hate relationship with his former club.

They also played.......
Name
Seasons
Position
Appearances
Goals
Keita Karamoko
2006-07
Gk
3
0
Dennis Keen
1964-65
CF
2
1
Dave Kellman
1995-96
CF
13+3
7
Peter Kemp
1983-84
CF
43+1
13
R Kerridge
1946-48
IL/LH
4
1
Tommy Kerwin
1969-70
Fwd
7+5
2
Norman King
1950-51
CH
2
0
N King
1937-38
LH
1
0
Robert King
1986-87
MF
0+1
0
Ron King
1959-60
LB
4
0
Alan Kinsella
1967-68
Fwd
4
1
D Kirk
1945-46
CF
1
1
Reece Kirk
2006-07
Gk
1
0

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