Hayes & Yeading United Football Club

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Sceeny - Smile

We start with one of the giants in the history of the club – Alf ‘Bass’ Sceeny. Born at Dawley in 1895, he went to the Hayes Council School in Clayton Road and was one of the original members of Botwell Mission FC. At school he was a goalkeeper and conceded only 14 goals in 19 matches in 1908-9, but it was at right-half that he played for the Mission until his retirement in 1931. His abilities were recognised by the HanwelAlf Sceenyl & District League, in which the Mission competed, when he represented them against Richmond on Boxing Day 1913. During World War I he served on the Somme and at Salonika. On the resumption of football, he was soon selected for his county and later for the Spartan League. Together with his friend and neighbour, Sonny Long, he saw the Mission through its change of name to Hayes and still played regularly up until his last competitive game against Barnet on 2 May 1931. He also played on the tour to Paris at the end of the season. But he did not play in the Amateur Cup final – there was no room for sentiment. In senior football (from 1919) he made 348 appearances, scoring 11 goals, but that old historian, Jimmy Ogden, reckoned that he and Long had both played more than 600 matches each. During his career, Alf won many trophies and medals: four Great Western Suburban League winners medals, a Spartan League winners medal, three Middlesex Senior Cup medals and three Charity Cup medals, as well as a Middlesex Minor Cup medal, and West Middlesex Cup, Southall Charity Cup and Uxbridge & District League medals. Alf owed his nickname ‘Bass’ not to the beer – he was teetotal – but to the fact that his father sold Bassau nuts (animal feed) and the name attached itself to him and his father. During his working life he was employed by the ‘X’ Chair Company in Silverdale Road and also worked as a labourer, helping to build the house in Orchard Road that he eventually lived in. His last employment before retirement was with EMI as a record presser. He was a regular visitor to Church Road and was awarded a ground pass in March 1972. Fittingly but sadly, it was at the ground that he died, in November 1975, at the age of 80, collapsing in the dressing room while talking to the players before a match with Kingstonian.

During wartime, distinctions between amateur and professional were largely ignored. H. Schofield was apparently a professional with QPR, although his name does not appear in any of their published records, but this did not stop him turning out in mid-season 1939-40 for Hayes in the Great Western Combination and the Middlesex Charity Cup (known as the Red Cross Fund Competition) or for Hayes Cricket Club. He played six matches at centre-forward, scoring five goals.

Amos Scott made only 13 appearances in his two spells with Hayes, in 1934-5 and 1937-8, and scored two goals, but one of them was highly significant and would have enabled him to dine out on the story for the rest of his life. That goal was the equaliser in the London Challenge Cup against mighty Arsenal at Highbury and enabled Hayes to take the Gunners to a replay. But he did not take part in the replay, his place being taken by Joe Hunter. He played at outside-left against Arsenal, although he normally was a full-back. After his first stint with the club he joined neighbours Hayesco, the footballing wing of the Hayes Cocoa Company (later Nestlé). But when that club foundered in December 1936, he joined Uxbridge. He rejoined Hayes in September 1937.

Josh ScottJosh Scott was to become a bit of an enigma in his time as a Missioner, possessing great speed and much talent, this was however not always channeled into his performances. He came through the ranks from FEDO and reserves to make his first team debut in September 2003 at the age of 18, opening his goalscoring account in his very next game against Maidenhead United. In the final pre-merger season he was finding fitness and goals hard to come by until an enforced time away from the game saw him return to Church Road much leaner and with his old zest returned he ended the season as top scorer. In his time with Hayes he made 78+50 appearances, finding the net on 45 occasions. Another to sign a contract with the newly formed Hayes & Yeading United.
Micky Scott


Although he made 168+10 appearances, mainly at centre-half, and scored 10 goals from 1979 to 1985, Micky Scott had the happy knack of staying out of the limelight. Named Sportsman of the Year at the end of his first season, he simply got on with his game until released by George Goode in July 1985.

His namesake, Peter Scott, was one of Terry Brown's first signings when Hayes made its bow in the Conference in August 1996. A midfielder, he had started with Fulham and came to Hayes from Barnet, but he was clearly struggling for match-fitness - this was probably not helped by the fact that he was a publican - and was released in September 1996, having made only 2+1 appearances. He later was seen playing for Harrow Borough.

Unusually, Peter Scrivens spent two spells with Hayes, both times on loan. Terry Brown first brought him in from his former club, Wokingham Town, after a poor run of results in March 1994, which had seen incumbent goalkeeper Ian Chatfield concede 24 goals in 11 games without keeping a single clean sheet. In his four games, Peter kept three clean sheets. After spells at Fleet Town and Newport IOW, in August 1995 he was back, as cover for Russell Meara, who had been sent off in his first game for Hayes and suffered a 3-game suspension. In November Meara was again sent off and Scrivens found himself covering for Meara's absence - but this time he suffered two of only four defeats during Hayes' promotion season, before returning to Newport IOW. All told, he made 12 appearances for Hayes and later played for Berkhamsted Town.

David Sculley worked as a clerk in the Admiralty and played for Hornchurch until he moved to Hillingdon in 1964. He had already been selected for the Athenian League representative team in 1963 and graduated to the first team via the reserves and made his debut at centre-half against Hillingdon Borough in a winning FA Cup tie, when Brian Gibbs was unavailable. He made the position his own for the rest of the season and was also selected for Middlesex. He was known as a serious thinker and gave little away either on the ground or in the air. Next season he missed the opening fixture and was obliged to move to left-back, drifting out of the team in October 1965. He made a total of 53 appearances.

Born at Boness in Scotland in 1946, Stewart Scullion came south in 1959 at the age of 13, living at Greenford, went to Bourne Secondary School, and worked as an accounts clerk with BEA. It was while playing against other airlines that he was discovered. His first club was Chesham United in 1965. He then signed for Charlton and went to Watford in part-exchange for Cliff Holton. Next stop was Sheffield United. He then joined the gravy train to the United States, where an attempt was being made to introduce the game of soccer, playing for Tampa Bay Rowdies, alongside Rodney Marsh. As soccer is a summer sport there (the winters are impossibly cold), he returned to England in November 1976 and signed for Hayes. He had started out as an outside-right but matured into a midfield player. Next February he was back in the USA with Portland Timbers. It was during this stay that he played for Team America against the touring England party, alongside Pele, and scored his team's goal. He rejoined Hayes in October 1977 for another spell, followed briefly by a third in 1981-2. Later in the same season he was playing for Yeading. During his three spells he made a total of 35+9 appearances and scored six goals.

Jim ScullyCentre-half Jim Scully was already 27 years old when he came to Hayes in February 1938. He had made his reputation as a member of the all-conquering, but short-lived Park Royal side which had won the Middlesex Senior Cup in 1934-5, eliminating Hayes in the first round, before being effectively taken over by Southall in the next season. This was the season in which Southall became the first amateur side to reach the 3rd round of the FA Cup after knocking out Swindon Town and Newport IOW, before succumbing to Watford. Jim’s career at Hayes spanned the Second World War; he played his last game in October 1948 and notched up 93 appearances, scoring two goals.

Darren SeabrookDarren Seabrook was an example of an era of players who were very competent at a non-league level but, when it became apparent that they would not break into the Football League - he had trials with Wimbledon - who sought their fortune abroad, where the game was becoming established. Having previously played for Kelmscott, he joined Hayes on his return from Australia in the summer of 1989. He had two full seasons with Hayes - in 1989-90 and 1991-2 - winning Isthmian League representative honours, with a season back in Australia in between. During this time he made 62+17 appearances and scored 20 goals. He later played for Aylesbury United, Harrow Borough, Wealdstone, Harefield United and London Colney and was still playing in 2003-4 for Sun Sports.

The story of Keith Searle is still difficult to understand, even over three decades later. Born at Hammersmith in 1947, and living at Harrow, he had played for Wealdstone, Barnet and Wycombe Wanderers, where he had won a leagueKeith Searle championship medal in 1970-1, when he signed for Bob Gibbs at Hayes in preparation for the club's first season in the Isthmian League. He was highly rated and successful at Wycombe - he had even scored the goal at Oxford which gave Wycombe the championship. His departure caused consternation at Wycombe, but when he arrived at Hayes he played with a chip on his shoulder. After two weeks and two defeats, Bob Gibbs took him aside and talked to him into the early hours to ascertain whether his heart was with Hayes. When it became clear that it was not, Gibbs sacked him and he returned to Wycombe, where he won three more championship medals (1971-2, 1973-4 and 1974-5), to Enfield (three more, bringing his total to seven), and Oxford City. He won only one amateur cap - this would have been more if amateurism had not been abolished in 1974. But he had the last laugh over Hayes, for, in a 4th round Amateur Cup tie in 1972, he scored the only goal of the game. In the semi-final, Wycombe lost to eventual winners Hendon - next season Searle joined Hendon, but he was back at Wycombe by March 1974, in time for another medal. History looks to have repeated itself.  With the benefit of hindsight, one gets the impression that he craved success and had allowed himself to be manoeuvred into a position that he did not know how to get out of. It seems clear that he had allowed a grievance at Wycombe to grow out of all proportion. Quite a long story for someone who played only two games.

FC Sedgwick joined Hayes in November 1931 from Wealdstone. He was also on Crystal Palace's books as an amateur. He played eight games in goal over two seasons, before going to Walthamstow Avenue in 1933. He was back in Middlesex next season, when he played for Uxbridge against Hayes. But he had obviously had a productive time at Walthamstow, as his marriage to Ellen Summers is reported (with photograph) in the Walthamstow & Leyton Guardian in April 1935.

Steve Senior came to Hayes from Northwood in 1973 and moved on to Maidenhead United, where he joined former Missioners Kenny Kent and John Hutchinson. He made 17+8 appearances and scored six goals.

Two players with the same surname and who both played at outside-left came to Hayes at the age of 20 with an intervening gap of ten years. Phil Seward worked in printing and came from Yiewsley reserves, where he had scored over 30 goals, in July 1963. He scored on his debut on the opening day of the 1963-4 season, but played only once more, before going to Canada with a view to settling there in 1965.

Hailing from Paddington and employed as a sheet metal worker, Frank Seward came to Hayes from Hounslow Town in 1974 at the age of 20 and played two seasons with Hayes. During this time he made 67+8 appearances and scored nine goals. He had previously played for Fulham juniors and was a member of the side which won the South East Counties League Cup. In July 1976 he moved to Harrow Borough where he rejoined Geoff Taylor, his previous manager at Hounslow. He moved on to Wembley in August 1981.

Eileen ShackleOur next .entry is the only exception to the title of this long-running series: Eileen Shackle was the daughter of Edward Nield Shackle, whose mother, Emily Shackle, had had the mission church at Botwell (now the library in Golden Crescent) erected in memory of her husband, Edward Hinde Shackle, in 1896. Eileen’s father took an interest in sport, presenting the prizes at the sports day for local factories, whilst his brother Ernest William refereed the Hayes Open Lawn Tennis Tournament, became Master of the Berks & Bucks Farmers’ Staghounds after the Great War, and won over one hundred point-to-point races, and eventually provided Botwell Mission FC with its first pitch. Eileen, who was born on 20 March 1891, announced at a concert which she had organised in 1909 that she intended to start a football team for the youth of the area, to be known as ‘Botwell Mission’, as a means of recreation and in the hope of encouraging their religious convictions. The family offered the players facilities at the Mission church for meetings and storage of gear. She could thus qualify as the first female ‘manager’ of a football club that was to eventually gain senior status.

When Arthur Shaw joined Hayes from Southall in December 1945, he was already being talked about as a future England amateur international inside-forward. At Easter 1946 he toured Holland with an England Amateur XI, having played 19 times for Hayes and having scored four goals, but then changed direction by turning professional with Brentford, recently relegated from Division One. He stayed with the Bees for almost two years, making just four first-team appearances, before joining Arsenal in April 1948. He was remembered at Highbury in April 2004, when he was a guest of the Gunners, together with his daughter, and was invited on to the pitch to take the crowd’s applause.

Peter Shearing was a goalkeeping prodigy. He had already played for London Schoolboys against Glasgow at Hampden Park, when he came from Uxbridge at the age of 16 in 1954 as understudy to David Rive. He was soon thrown into the deep end and performed creditably between the posts. When Football League champions Chelsea sent their first-team squad to Church Road for an end-of-season friendly, Peter was chosen as the last line of defence. As a schoolboy he had played at centre-forward for Willesden Schools, although his father thought that his best position was centre-half. His versatility showed when, on the Whitsun tour of Switzerland, he played at centre-forward against Muttenz and scored Hayes' only goal. At Hayes he made 12 appearances, before joining Hendon in the autumn of 1955. He moved to Kingstonian in February 1959, but was soon back at Hendon and won an Amateur Cup winners medal against Kingstonian in 1960. He had been on both Tottenham Hotspur's and West Ham United's books before turning professional with West Ham in 1960, later playing for Portsmouth and Exeter City. But he was injured when Exeter met Hayes in an FA Cup tie in 1964 and could not play against his old club.

Ron SheenIn the late 1940s there was an active rivalry between Bromley and Hayes, both Athenian League clubs, who were regularly the pundits’ favourites to lift the Amateur Cup. Bromley achieved the feat in 1948-9, with former Hayes player Doug Cameron at left-back, but Hayes always flattered to deceive. Cameron was just one of several players who went from Hayes to Bromley; one of the few to make the return journey was wing-half or inside-forward Ron Sheen, who originated from and still lived at Bromley. A schoolboy international in 1938-9, Ron joined Hayes from Bromley in September 1946. He briefly returned to Hayes Lane in August 1947, but was back at Church Road the following month and stayed for another season. He made 61 appearances and scored five goals before joining Redhill for two seasons in late 1948. Then, inevitably, he was back at Bromley, where he was still playing in 1954-5.

Centre-half James Shipperley came of footballing stock. His James Shipperleyfather had been manager of Brook House and his brother Neil has played for Chelsea, Southampton, Crystal Palace and Sheffield United. James had the misfortune to be drafted into a struggling side in the Conference in a position which had caused problems all season long. Once relegated, he looked more at ease at the lower level and scored his only goal on his last appearance in the final match of the 2002-3 season. He had made 15+10 appearances. He was released at the end of the season and joined Wealdstone.

Dave Silman was a centre-back, who joined Hayes from Harrow Borough in summer 1985. He had started as an apprentice at Wolverhampton Wanderers, and subsequently played for QPR, Brentford, Dagenham, Walthamstow Avenue and Enfield. Over two seasons he made 72+12 appearances for Hayes and scored eight goals. He later played for Ruislip Manor and Staines Town.

Another player with a Bromley connection, albeit tenuous, was goalkeeper Alf Simmonds. Alf SimmondsHe joined Hayes from Walthamstow Avenue in March 1946 and worked in the accounts department of the Hayes News. He played for Hayes for three seasons, even turning down the chance to play for Watford in February 1948. In this time he made 80 appearances. During the summer of 1948, together with Ron Gadsden, he toured Holland with the Chelsea Mariners, a selection of amateur players from London. Later that summer he received his cap from Middlesex and played for a Hayes XI against the Indian Olympic team, before taking part in pre-season training at Great Yarmouth. He was pushing for the appointment of an experienced team manager, but when it became apparent that none would be appointed, he left and rejoined Walthamstow. Two seasons later he was playing for Bromley reserves and a season later for Redhill.

Bernie Simpson joined Hayes from Barnet in February 1967, having previously played for Cheshunt. He made 44+7 appearances, mainly at centre- and wing-half, and scored two goals before going to college at Leicester in 1968. Thereafter he played for his old club Wingate, when available.

Roly Skelton was a full-back and reserve team skipper. He was called in as a last-minute substitute when a mystery virus struck down several players in October 1970. He made 5+2 appearances.

Regarded  as one of Hayes’ best players up front in the 1980s, Robin Smale had two spells at Church Road. Joining at the age of 20 in October 1985 from St Albans City, where he had been top scorer in 1984-5, he played for the rest of the season, registering 23+8 appearances and six goals, but went back for 1986-7. An injury then kept him out of football for 18 months, and he came back to Hayes in summer 1989, making only five substitute appearances before returning to St Albans again in January 1990. 

When he was coach at Wokingham Town, Terry Brown was an admirer of right-back Garry Smart, before he was sold to Oxford United, where he made over 200 appearances during six seasons. He later played for Woking, Chertsey Town and Chesham United, from where he joined Hayes in January 1996 at the age of 29. He made 6+2 appearances for Hayes before Brown was obliged to off-load him for budgetary reasons to Slough Town. He later played for Aldershot Town, Oxford City, and Windsor & Eton.

They also played.......
Name
Seasons
Position
Appearances
Goals
A Scott
1968-69
FB
3+1
0
J Scott
1966-67
RB
1
0
J Sharp
1919-20
CH/RB
6
0
Bill Shields
1945-46
OR
3
1
B Shone
1928-29
CF
1
1
B Shorter
1935-36
IL
7
2
D Sidey
1965-66
OL
1
0
C Simpson
1945-46
OR
1
0
V Simpson
1947-48
OL
1
0
P Skelton
1948-49
IR
1
0
Stan Skillings
1938-39
OL
2
1
Steve Slade
2001-02
CF
1
0
Steve Sladen
2001-02
Gk
4
0
Eddie Smile
1958-59
CF/OL
2
1

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